Are you prepared to hike a 14er?

Find out if you know how to show up prepared and stay safe while hiking and climbing Colorado's tallest mountains.

Sady Swanson
Created by Sady Swanson
On Jun 27, 2019
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How physically fit are you?

You just got to the trailhead, what time is it?

Did you tell anyone where you were going and when you planned to be back?

Are you hiking alone or with a buddy?

How much water do you have?

What other gear do you have?

What clothes are you wearing?

You're halfway up and starting to feel sick and tired, what do you do?

It's getting late in the day and you haven't reached the summit, what do you do?

You see dark clouds rolling in quickly, what do you do?

You suddenly realize you're lost, and your phone isn't getting reception. What do you do?

You're ready to conquer that 14er!

You're ready to conquer that 14er!

When it comes to challenging hikes, you know your stuff. But just because you're ready to hike a 14er doesn't mean you should. If you're feeling sick or tired, or if the weather isn't holding up, don't hesitate to turn back. You can always try the hike again later. And remember: not every 14er is created equal. Know your limits and plan your route ahead of time so there are so surprises.

A 14er might not be right for you.

A 14er might not be right for you.

You know some key safety skills, but you might want to try a shorter or easier hike before tackling the terrain of a 14er. Don't worry, you can still enjoy incredible views (and earn bragging rights) when accomplishing shorter, less difficult hikes.

You should probably do some research before hitting the trails.

You should probably do some research before hitting the trails.

It doesn't sound like you're quite ready to take on the challenge of a 14er. Make sure you do your research on your route, know what to bring, and do some shorter, less difficult hikes to get in shape. (Also, did you know you can drive to the top of one of Colorado's 14ers, Mount Evans? Another good option.)