Do you speak North Jersey, South Jersey or Centralese?

Despite the depiction in pop culture of a stereotypical New Jersey accent, the state actually straddles several different dialect regions. We've divided the map into five areas: North, South, Central and two smaller areas - the upper Delaware River area and the Atlantic City/Jersey shore area which are their own linguistic pockets. Which one do you fall into? Take the quiz to find out.

NJ.com
Created By NJ.com
On Mar 29, 2017

What do you call this frozen treat?

When you say "bagel" it sounds like:

You call your parents' parents:

Say the name of this writing implement out loud. It sounds like:

Say the sentence, "The cookies are gone." The word 'gone' rhymes with:

The first vowel in "water" sounds like the vowel in:

This is a:

North Jersey

North Jersey

Howyadoin! Your North Jersey accent is part of the larger New York City dialect region that includes a large portion of the Garden State. It's the accent most commonly, stereotypically, (and erroneously) portrayed in movies and television as the sole NJ accent.

South Jersey

South Jersey

Go Iggles! Your Mid-Atlantic accent is shared by south Jerseyans, Philadelphians, Delaware and parts of Maryland and other east coast states. It's the accent the folks in "Silver Linings Playbook" should have had but didn't, because Hollywood almost always gets it wrong. (See also "Rocky Balboa")

Central Jersey

Central Jersey

Pork Roll? Taylor Ham? Both? The area from Trenton north and eastward across the state is considered an intermediate area between the New York City and Mid Atlantic dialects. Sometimes borrowing from both and sometimes simply sounding like midwestern standard broadcaster-speak. Freehold native Bruce Springsteen is talks like you.

Upper Delaware

Upper Delaware

While well north of what is considered the north/south Jersey dividing line, the Delaware valley areas in Hunterdon and Warren County share more linguistically with Philadelphia than New York City. You're probably more likely to root for the Phillies than the Yankees or Mets, too. It's a sign that that line that divides New Jersey culturally and linguistically lies more along the East/West Jersey lines drawn in colonial days.

Atlantic City/Jersey shore

Atlantic City/Jersey shore

Jackpot! You share a lot in common with speakers along the Jersey Shore as far south as Atlantic City. Parts of the Jersey Shore lie closer to Philly than New York but feel the linguistic influence of New York nonetheless - which is why the famous White House Subs shop in Atlantic City is not "White House Hoagies."