BUILD A TART, AND I'LL RECOMMEND A LESS FAMOUS NATIONAL DESSERT

Enjoy! :)

Miss Kalorie
Created By Miss Kalorie
On Feb 8, 2018

Before you begin building, pick a theme for your tart.

Now, you must decide would you like to eat one big or a few mini tarts.

Choose a cream for your tart/s.

What would you like to add to the cream?

Which flavor would you add into the cream?

Choose a decoration.

Pick a tart/s that looks/are looking the most similar to the one/s you wanted.

PAÇOCA

PAÇOCA

Paçoca is a candy made out of ground peanuts, sugar and salt. Some recipes also add flour, such as corn flour, oats flour or cassava flour.
It is known for its distinct dry texture and sweet taste, and is one of the most beloved Brazilian candies. The traditional artisanal process of making paçoca involves first roasting the peanuts, then grinding all the ingredients together using a traditional Mortar (pilão). In more modern manufacturing techniques, instead of a mortar, industrial blenders are used, and the Paçocas are later pressed into many shapes, most commonly square or cork shapes.
Some companies have created variations from the traditional Paçoca recipe, which include a diet version, with no sugar added, and a higher peanut concentration.

DONAUWELLE

DONAUWELLE

Donauwelle (literally 'Danube wave' in German) is a traditional sheet cake popular in Germany and Austria. The cake's name comes from its wavy pattern inside and its swirled chocolate decoration, although the reason for naming it after the Danube in particular is not clear.
It is made of layers of plain and chocolate pound cake combined to have a wavy border between them. It contains sour cherries and is topped with buttercream and chocolate glaze.
The batter is a pound cake, a cake made of equal amounts by weight of butter, flour, eggs and sugar, which is then divided into two parts, one of which is colored with cocoa. The two batters are spread in layers onto the baking sheet, the chocolate batter above the plain batter, before the top is strewn with sour cherries. During baking, the cherries sink to the bottom of the cake, causing the wavy pattern. After the cake has cooled it is decorated with a thick layer of buttercream and iced with a chocolate glaze which may then be ornamented in a wavy manner with a fork.

FINIKIA

FINIKIA

Finikia or Phinikia is a type of Greek cookie.
The cookie is made using flour, baking powder, orange juice, and oil. No dairy products are used. After baking in the oven, the finikia are rolled in a mixture of cinnamon, sugar and ground walnuts.
Melomakarona, another type of Greek cookie dessert, is made with the same ingredients, but after baking, is dipped into a syrup mixture consisting of sugar, honey, water, orange zest, and cloves. Then it is rolled in the ground walnut, sugar and cinnamon mixture.

ESTERHÁZY TORTE

ESTERHÁZY TORTE

Esterházy torta is a Hungarian cake named after Prince Paul III Anton Esterházy de Galántha (1786–1866), a member of the Esterházy dynasty and diplomat of the Austrian Empire. It was invented by Budapest confectioners in the late 19th century and soon became one of the most famous cakes in the lands of the Austro-Hungarian Monarchy.
It consists of buttercream spiced with cognac or vanilla, sandwiched between four and five layers of almond meringue (macaroon) dough. The torte is iced with a fondant glaze and decorated with a characteristic chocolate striped pattern.
There are, however, many different recipe variations. In Hungary, the original almonds have been entirely replaced by walnuts.

BASUNDI

BASUNDI

Basundi is an Indian sweet. It is a sweetened condensed milk made by boiling milk on low heat until the milk is reduced by half. In North India, a similar dish goes by the name rabri.
It is often made on Hindu festivals such as Kali Chaudas and Bhaubeej (Bhai Dooj).
Heavy cream may be added during the boiling process to hasten the thickening process. Once reduced, a little sugar, cardamom, charoli and/or saffron are added. Basundi is preserved well after sugar is added. Sugar develops some acidity over a period of time. If it is excessive, then it can curdle the basundi. Some times after adding sugar, one cooks it for some more time; this gives a nice pink color to basundi, as sugar is also cooked in milk turning into a light caramel. Before adding sugar, basundi is thick, but after adding, it becomes again fluid. Stirring well prevents from malai being formed on top and all guests (even late comers) can enjoy equally thick and plain basundi. Basundi is served chilled, often garnished with slices of almonds and pistachios. Adding less saffron reduces colour intensity. The addition of condensed milk gives a nice flavour and wealth to basundi.

PANELLETS

PANELLETS

Panellets are the traditional dessert of the All Saints' Day, known as Castanyada, in Catalonia, Andorra, Ibiza and the Land of Valencia, with chestnuts and sweet potatoes.
Panellets are often accompanied with a sweet wine, usually moscatell, mistela, vi de missa or vi ranci. Panellets are small cakes or cookies in different shapes, mostly round, made mainly of marzipan (a paste made of almonds and sugar). The most popular are the panellets covered with pine nuts, consisting of the panellet basis (marzipan) rolled in pine nuts and varnished with egg.
It is believed that its origins are in Northern Europe, more likely of Arab origin for the ingredients used.

FIOS DE OVOS

FIOS DE OVOS

Angel hair, called in Portuguese fios de ovos ("egg threads") is a traditional Portuguese sweet food made of eggs (chiefly yolks), drawn into thin strands and boiled in sugar syrup.
They are a traditional element in Portuguese and Brazilian cuisine, both in desserts and as side dishes.
They are a traditional element in Portuguese and Brazilian cuisine, both in desserts and as side dishes. In Japan, they are served in the form of dessert rolls (wagashi).

SUMAN

SUMAN

Suman is a rice cake originating in the Philippines.
It is made from glutinous rice cooked in coconut milk, often wrapped in banana leaves or buli or buri palm (Corypha) leaves for steaming. It is usually eaten sprinkled with sugar or laden with latik. A widespread variant of suman uses cassava instead of glutinous rice.
There are numerous varieties of suman, with almost every town or locality having its speciality.