BUILD A CAKE, AND I'LL RECOMMEND A NATIONAL DESSERT

Enjoy! :)

Miss Kalorie
Created By Miss Kalorie
On Feb 8, 2018

Before you begin, pick a theme for the cake.

Now, choose a shape of your cake.

How many layers would it have?

Let's fill it, shall we? Choose a cream.

Choose a flavor to put in the cream.

Pick a spice.

Choose some seeds.

Pick some fruits.

We came to decoration! Choose some.

Choose a syrup or spread to cover the cake.

Choose another type of decoration.

What would be the main decoration for your cake?

You built it! Now, choose a cake that looks the most similar to the one you wanted.

For the end, you must decide which drink goes best with the theme of your cake.

CRÈME BRÛLÉE

CRÈME BRÛLÉE

Crème brûlée, also known as burnt cream, crema catalana, or Trinity cream is a dessert consisting of a rich custard base topped with a contrasting layer of hard caramel. It is normally served at room temperature. The custard base is traditionally flavored with vanilla, but can have a variety of other flavorings.
It is usually served in individual ramekins. Discs of caramel may be prepared separately and put on top just before serving, or the caramel may be formed directly on top of the custard, immediately before serving. To do this, sugar is sprinkled onto the custard, then caramelized under a salamander broiler or with a butane torch.
Crème brûlée was not very common in French and English cookbooks of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, but it became extremely popular in the 1980's.

ÉCLAIR

ÉCLAIR

An éclair is an oblong pastry made with choux dough filled with a cream and topped with icing. The dough, which is the same as that used for profiterole, is typically piped into an oblong shape with a pastry bag and baked until it is crisp and hollow inside. Once cool, the pastry is then filled with a vanilla-, coffee- or chocolate-flavoured custard (crème pâtissière), or with whipped cream, or chiboust cream; and then iced with fondant icing.
Other fillings include pistachio- and rum-flavoured custard, fruit-flavoured fillings, or chestnut purée. The icing is sometimes caramel, in which case the dessert may be called a bâton de Jacob.
The word comes from French éclair 'flash of lightning', so named because it is eaten quickly (in a flash).

TIRAMISU

TIRAMISU

Tiramisu, meaning "pick me up", "cheer me up" or "lift me up" is a popular coffee-flavoured Italian dessert. It is made of ladyfingers dipped in coffee, layered with a whipped mixture of eggs, sugar, and mascarpone cheese, flavoured with cocoa. The recipe has been adapted into many varieties of cakes and other desserts.
Its origins are often disputed among Italian regions of Veneto, Friuli-Venezia Giulia, Piedmont, and others.
Numerous variations of Tiramisu exist. Some cooks use other cakes or sweet, yeasted breads, such as panettone, in place of ladyfingers. Other cheese mixtures are used as well, some containing raw eggs, and others containing no eggs at all. Marsala wine can be added to the recipe, but other liquors are frequently substituted for it in both the coffee and the cheese mixture, including dark rum, Madeira, port, brandy, Malibu, or Irish cream and especially coffee-flavoured liqueurs such as Tia Maria and Kahlúa. Disaronno is also often used to enhance the taste of tiramisu.

CANNOLI

CANNOLI

Cannoli are Italian pastries of the Sicily region. The Italian singular is cannolo means "little tube".
They are also popular in Italian-American cuisine.
Cannoli consist of tube-shaped shells of fried pastry dough, filled with a sweet, creamy filling usually containing ricotta. They range in size from "cannulicchi", no bigger than a finger, to the fist-sized proportions typically found south of Palermo, Sicily, in Piana degli Albanesi.

BAKLAVA

BAKLAVA

Baklava is a rich, sweet dessert pastry made of layers of filo filled with chopped nuts and sweetened and held together with syrup or honey. It is characteristic of the cuisines of the Levant, the Caucasus, Balkans, Maghreb, and of Central and West Asia.
Baklava is normally prepared in large pans. Many layers of filo dough, separated with melted butter and vegetable oil, are laid in the pan. A layer of chopped nuts—typically walnuts or pistachios, but hazelnuts are also sometimes used—is placed on top, then more layers of filo. Most recipes have multiple layers of filo and nuts, though some have only top and bottom pastry. Before baking (180 °C, 356 °F, 30 minutes), the dough is cut into regular pieces, often parallelograms (lozenge-shaped), triangles, diamonds or rectangles. After baking, a syrup, which may include honey, rosewater, or orange flower water is poured over the cooked baklava and allowed to soak in. Baklava is usually served at room temperature, often garnished with ground nuts.
In Turkey, baklava is traditionally made by filling between the layers of dough with pistachios, walnuts, almonds or a special preparation called kaymak.

TURKISH DELIGHTS

TURKISH DELIGHTS

Turkish delight, lokum or rahat lokum and many other transliterations is a family of confections based on a gel of starch and sugar.
Premium varieties consist largely of chopped dates, pistachios, and hazelnuts or walnuts bound by the gel; traditional varieties are often flavored with rosewater, mastic, Bergamot orange, or lemon. The confection is often packaged and eaten in small cubes dusted with icing sugar, copra, or powdered cream of tartar, to prevent clinging. Other common flavors include cinnamon and mint. In the production process, soapwort may be used as an emulsifying additive.
The origin of the confection is not well established, but it is known to have been produced in Turkey as early as the late 1700's.