Which Mormon History Villain Do You Think Like?

We all let go of the rod at times (some of us more than others!). If you turned to the dark side and let a little sin in, what Mormon History Villain would you most resemble? Explore the many varieties of Mormons by taking this quiz and explore the Mormon Mind at the Sunstone Salt Lake Symposium this year in Salt Lake City on July 26 - 29, 2017. Register here: sunstone.org

Sunstone Education Foundation
On Jun 21, 2017

When I let go of the iron rod, even for a little bit, I am tempted to:

Are you a Mormon?

Which "unapproved" American Television show do you watch? (We won't tell your bishop)

What is your favorite Mormon Food?

When you come to the Sunstone Symposium, you enjoy sessions about?

What Mormon History book interests you the most?

When a bad thought enters your brain, you don't sing a hymn, instead you...

Wild Bill Hickman

Wild Bill Hickman

William Hickman was baptized into Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints in 1839 by John D. Lee. He later served as a personal bodyguard for Joseph Smith, Jr. and Brigham Young. Hickman was reputedly a member of the Danites.

Hickman, who was well-known locally as "Wild Bill," was quick with his temper and fast with the pearl-handled Colt and Yaeger revolvers that he kept slung around his hips.

Hickman, a practicing polygamist, was excommunicated from the LDS Church in 1868. Shortly thereafter, nine of his ten wives left him. According to his autobiography, Hickman's excommunication immediately followed his refusal to commit an assassination at Brigham Young's request.

Around Sept 1871, while under arrest for the murder of Richard Yates years earlier, Hickman wrote an autobiography/confession in which he confessed to numerous, gruesome murders.
Hickman was re-baptized by proxy into the LDS Church on May 5, 1934

Joyce McKinney

Joyce McKinney

The Mormon sex in chains case was a widely reported scandal involving a sexual assault by an American woman, Joyce McKinney, on a young American male Mormon missionary, Kirk Anderson, in England in 1977. According to Anderson, he had been abducted by McKinney from the steps of a church meetinghouse, chained to a bed and raped by her. Before the case could be tried, McKinney had jumped bail and fled to America. The case aroused amusement and curiosity, especially as rape by a woman was not on the statute book at the time.

Mark Hofman

Mark Hofman

Mark William Hofmann is an American counterfeiter, forger and convicted murderer. Widely regarded as one of the most accomplished forgers in history, Hofmann is especially noted for his creation of documents related to the history of the Latter Day Saint movement. When Hofmann's schemes began to unravel, he constructed bombs to murder two people in Salt Lake City, Utah. He has been serving a life sentence at the Utah State Prison in Draper since 1988.

John C. Bennett

John C. Bennett

ohn Cook Bennett was an American physician and a ranking and influential—but short-lived—leader of the Latter Day Saint movement, who acted as Mayor of Nauvoo, Illinois, and Major-General of the Nauvoo Legion for a brief period in the early 1840s.

Bennett was excommunicated from the church for adultery on May 11, 1842. Rumors of adultery, homosexuality, unauthorized polygamy emerged. Contemporary sources indicate that Bennett used his trusted position as a doctor to allay fears of women he attempted to seduce; telling them that he could cause abortions by administering medicine, should they become pregnant.[4] While Bennett was mayor, he was caught in private sexual relations with women in the city. He told the women that the practice, which he termed "spiritual wifery", was sanctioned by God and Smith, and that Smith did the same. When discovered, he privately confessed his crimes, produced an affidavit that Smith had no part in his adultery and was disciplined accordingly

Arthur Gary Bishop

Arthur Gary Bishop

Served a mission in the Philippines. Excommunicated in 1974. In 1983, when questioned by police regarding the disappearance of a neighborhood boy he knew, he confessed to having killed him and four others. Alonzo Daniels was killed in 1979 at the age of four after being kidnapped from the courtyard of his apartment complex. Kim Peterson was killed in 1980 at the age of eleven after being lured into Bishop's house to sell roller skates. Danny Davis was killed in 1981 at the age of four after being kidnapped from a grocery store. Troy Ward was killed in 1983 at the age of six. Graeme Cunningham was also killed in 1983 at the age of thirteen. Arthur Gary Bishop was executed by the State of Utah by lethal injection.

Lilburn W. Boggs

Lilburn W. Boggs

Lilburn Williams Boggs was the sixth Governor of Missouri from 1836 to 1840. He is now most widely remembered for his interactions with Joseph Smith and Porter Rockwell, and Missouri Executive Order 44, known by Mormons as the "Extermination Order", issued in response to the ongoing conflict between members of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints and other settlers of Missouri.

John D. Lee

John D. Lee

Jodi Arias

Jodi Arias

Jodi Arias killed her former boyfriend Travis Alexander on June 4, 2008. He was killed at his home in Mesa, Arizona. He had been shot in the face and stabbed some 27 times, his throat slit from ear to ear. The medical examiner ruled his death a homicide. Jodi Ann Arias was born in 1980, in Salinas, California. She and Alexander met in September. On November 26, 2006, Arias was baptized into the Church of Jesus-Christ of Latter-day Saints by Travis. They broke up on June 29, 2007. In 2009 the TV program "48 Hours" interviewed Jodi about the killing and murder charge. In 2013 she was found guilty of murder. The trial was shown live on national television. Her "fractured beliefs" of premarital sex in the Mormon Church was a subject covered in the trial.