What’s Your Most Annoying Workplace Habit?

Annoying workplace habits are something we often associate with coworkers. But it’s possible that you might be annoying them as well. Do you know how you’re annoying your coworkers? Take this quiz to discover your most annoying workplace habit. And then stop doing it!

Simply Hired
Created By Simply Hired
On Mar 19, 2015

What did you eat for lunch?

What was your best purchase last year?

What’s your office style?

How do you spend your lunch hour?

What’s on your desk?

How do you run your meetings?

How do you take your coffee?

The Smelly Guy/Gal

The Smelly Guy/Gal

Whether it’s burnt popcorn in the break room microwave, enough cologne to keep Chanel in business singlehandedly or an outfit that hasn’t been washed since before Burning Man, your coworkers can smell you coming. If this sounds like you, ask a few friends who are willing to be honest to weigh in. And remember: deodorant is your friend.

The Phone Abandoner

The Phone Abandoner

Too popular for your own good, your phone is constantly ringing. And as the odds would have it, your phone usually chooses to ring when you’re in a meeting…while your phone is still on your desk. Yes, the entire office can now sing along to your ringtone. That’s what happens when you leave the volume at 11. An app like IFTTT (https://ifttt.com) can help you silence your phone during work hours.

The Busybody

The Busybody

If anyone ever needs an opinion, they know to head straight to you. Whether it’s your coworkers’ dietary choices, clothing decisions or hobbies, you are ready to tell them the right way to do it. You keep track of your coworkers’ comings and goings, believing that work will only get done when everyone’s at their desk. You might not be able to tell your team how your new project is going, but you can absolutely confirm that Sally snuck out of the office at 4:43 last Monday. Perhaps it’s time to put down the stopwatch and focus on your own work?

The Human Abyss

The Human Abyss

Your inbox has so many unread emails that when you miss a day of work, you just delete them all and start over. When you promise to complete tasks by a certain date, your coworkers mentally add an extra month to their task list – not because they expect to receive your work that month, but so that they remember to ask you for a new ETA by then. Co-workers who ask you questions are left having to guess at the answers. They know you’ll never reply. You are the Human Abyss of work. Information flows in but results never come back out. Consider a productivity program such as David Allen’s Getting Things Done (http://gettingthingsdone.com) to help you organize your ever-increasing workload.