Test yourself: Do you care about your employees?

To test the extent to which you care about your employees, we devised a short questionnaire to help you assess yourself and start a round of improvements should they be needed

NGG
Created by NGG
On Jan 12, 2017

Good morning! When you come to the office in the morning, do you ask your employees how they are?

Do you listen when they answer?

When one of your employees is missing, do you check where s/he is because you’re concerned about his/her welfare?

In one-on-one conversations, do you talk to your employees about their needs, wishes, and worries, in addition to their tasks, goals, and performance?

When you get upset, do you take a deep breath and manage to respond without shouting and cursing?

Do you have an unmediated emotional relationship with your employees? Smiles, compliments, and pats on the back in different forums…

When one of your employees is upset, do you listen, accept, and provide a shoulder to cry on?

Do you offer to help your employees when they have a personal problem? Or do you consider it to be their own business?

Is the atmosphere of your team meetings pleasant and friendly?

Do you believe that the statement “only love begets love” is true also in business?

You’re a manager of the old school

You’re a manager of the old school

You’re a manager of the old school and it would be a good idea to ask someone to help you change your ways of thinking and behavior. You almost certainly have a high rate of employee turnover and that the employees still with you are looking for an opportunity to leave. They may be coming to work, but it’s not clear that they’re doing much work. They probably spend time gossiping about your terrible personality. This keeps them from producing and from making a true effort to achieve the goals by which you are measured.

You’re seen as a tough manager with whom it’s not particularly pleasant to work

You’re seen as a tough manager with whom it’s not particularly pleasant to work

You’re seen as a tough manager with whom it’s not particularly pleasant to work. The employees grouse because it’s tough to satisfy you, and you don’t particularly care about them, only about their output. Problems get hidden from you, so when there is a drop in productivity it will take you a long time to figure it out and be able to respond, because people are afraid of you. Fear is not a great work motivator, and it will take you a while to discover the issues and deal with them effectively.

Your employees aren’t afraid of you, but they also don’t see you're as having any added value

Your employees aren’t afraid of you, but they also don’t see you're as having any added value

It’s possible that your employees aren’t afraid of you, but they also don’t see your as having any added value for them as a motivator or someone to whom one can turn to for help when they need it. Still, you don’t have a completely negative approach to people, and it’s worth your while to start making true gestures at improving relations with your employees and the team atmosphere.

You are a caring and empowering manager

You are a caring and empowering manager

You are a caring and empowering manager. You truly care about your people and they see you as the go-to person to handle problems and discuss difficulties. The atmosphere of your teams is pleasant and supportive, and people feel that the positivity you project helps them do their job. Tasks are handled collegially and cooperatively, and when problems happen they are dealt with together. It is safe to assume that your goals are achieved and that your employees are happy and willing to continue making efforts at work.

You’re a type of social worker

You’re a type of social worker

You’re a type of social worker. Caring a lot about people is a prerequisite but it’s not enough. There is also work to do and goals to achieve. Make sure that your empathy, acceptance, and willingness to help do not get in the way of management that is also focused on goals and targets. Love at work means that there also has to be work going on.