What kind of feminist are you?

So you already know you're a feminist - now it's time to figure out just what kind of feminist you are!

High School Feminist
Created by High School Feminist
On Apr 28, 2014

What do you think is the root of gender inequality / women's oppression?

What's your favorite feminist book?

Which of the following quotes best speaks to you?

Which of the following words / phrases speaks to you the most?

In your opinion, what should be the focus of feminism?

Which of the following best symbolizes your kind of feminism?

Which of the following tends to be your shortcoming as a feminist?

Liberal feminist

Liberal feminist

You are a Liberal Feminist. You tend to focus on women's ability to show and maintain their equality through their own actions and choices. According to you, all women are capable of asserting their ability to achieve equality, therefore it is possible for change to happen without altering the structure of society. Issues important to you include reproductive and abortion rights, sexual harassment, voting, education, "equal pay for equal work", affordable childcare, affordable health care, and bringing to light the frequency of sexual and domestic violence against women.

For more feminist fun, check out my blog at http://iwasahighschoolfeminist.com/

Anarchist feminist

Anarchist feminist

You are an Anarcha-feminist. You generally views patriarchy as a manifestation of involuntary hierarchy. You believe that the struggle against patriarchy is an essential part of class struggle and of the anarchist struggle against the state. In essence, You see anarchist struggle as a necessary component of feminist struggle and vice-versa.

For works by anarcha-feminists, check out Germaine Greer, L. Susan Brown, and the eco-feminist Starhawk.

For more feminist fun, check out my blog at http://iwasahighschoolfeminist.com/

Eco-feminist

Eco-feminist

You are an Ecofeminist! You see the domination of women as stemming from the same ideologies that bring about the domination of the environment. You see Western patriarchal systems, where men own and control the land, as responsible for the oppression of women and destruction of the natural environment. You think that the men in power control the land, and therefore are able to exploit it for their own profit and success. In this situation, you consider women to be exploited by men in power for their own profit, success, and pleasure. Thus you believe that women and the environment are both exploited as passive pawns in the race to domination. You believe that those people in power are able to take advantage of them distinctly because they are seen as passive and rather helpless.

For more ecofeminist reading, check out Vandana Shiva.

For more feminist fun, check out my blog at http://iwasahighschoolfeminist.com/

Radical feminist

Radical feminist

You are a Radical Feminist! You consider the male-controlled capitalist hierarchy, which you describe as sexist, as the defining feature of women's oppression. You believe that women can free themselves only when they have done away with what you consider an inherently oppressive and dominating patriarchal system. You feel that there is a male-based authority and power structure and that it is responsible for oppression and inequality, and that, as long as the system and its values are in place, society will not be able to be reformed in any significant way. You may see no alternative other than the total uprooting and reconstruction of society in order to achieve your goals.

For more feminist fun, check out my blog at http://iwasahighschoolfeminist.com/

Intersectional feminist

Intersectional feminist

You are an Intersectional Feminist! You believe that sexism, class oppression, and racism are inextricably bound together, and your views are largely shaped by black feminists like Alice Walker. Forms of feminism that strive to overcome sexism and class oppression but ignore race can discriminate against many people, including women, through racial bias. You believe that the liberation of black women entails freedom for all people, since it would require the end of racism, sexism, and class oppression. These beliefs emerged after the early feminist movements that were led specifically by white women, were largely white middle-class movements, and had generally ignored oppression based on racism and classism. Alice Walker and other womanists pointed out that black women experienced a different and more intense kind of oppression from that of white women.

Check out Women, Race, and Class by Angela Davis and Mapping the Margins: Intersectionality, Identity Politics and Violence Against Women of Color by Kimberle Crenshaw.

For more feminist fun, check out my blog at http://iwasahighschoolfeminist.com/

Socialist feminist

Socialist feminist

You are a Socialist Feminist! You think unequal standing in both the workplace and the domestic sphere holds women down. You see prostitution, domestic work, childcare, and marriage as ways in which women are exploited by a patriarchal system that devalues women and the substantial work they do. You focus your energies on far-reaching change that affects society as a whole, rather than on an individual basis. You see the need to work alongside not just men but all other groups, as you see the oppression of women as a part of a larger pattern that affects everyone involved in the capitalist system.

For more feminist fun, check out my blog at http://iwasahighschoolfeminist.com/

Postmodern feminist

Postmodern feminist

You are a Postmodern Feminist! Like Judith Butler, you criticize the distinction drawn by previous feminisms between biological sex and socially constructed gender. You believe that the sex/gender distinction does not allow for a sufficient criticism of essentialism. For you, "woman" is a debatable category, complicated by class, ethnicity, sexuality, and other facets of identity, and that there is no single cause for women's subordination and no single approach towards dealing with the issue.

For more postmodern feminist reading, check out Judith Butler and Kate Bornstein!

For more feminist fun, check out my blog at http://iwasahighschoolfeminist.com/