Whose Guitar Rig Are You?

Care about gear? Find out which iconic player's taste matches up with yours with this quiz

dcreverb
Created By dcreverb
On Mar 29, 2017

What's your go-to guitar?

My gear philosophy can be described as...

Choose a drive pedal.

How about a modulation effect?

And an amp.

Fill in the blank. My guitar tone makes people ____.

Jimi Hendrix

Jimi Hendrix

Perhaps more than any single player of the '60s, Jimi Hendrix totally pushed the envelope of what the electric guitar could do. An early adopter of fuzz pedals, Jimi used stompboxes like the Dallas Arbiter Fuzz Face through a Marshall Stack to craft a fierce tone to match his revolutionary playing style. While most closely associated with a Fender Stratocaster, Jimi was also known to play a Gibson Flying V.

Stevie Ray Vaughan

Stevie Ray Vaughan

Blues legend Stevie Ray Vaughan took the blues to new heights with his searing tone and incredible skill. Stevie's rig was Fender first, with a Stratocaster in hand and amps like the Vibrolux backing him up. Stevie was also well known for using an Ibanez Tube Screamer.

Jonny Greenwood

Jonny Greenwood

The sound and gear of Radiohead's Jonny Greenwood has evolved through the years, but has always veered towards the experimental. While Jonny also plays a Fender Starcaster, he is most commonly seen with a Tele (a custom wired Telecaster Plus to be specific). In addition to a wide array of samplers, synths and other noisemakers, Jonny is known to use of a Roland RE-201 Space Echo.

Jimmy Page

Jimmy Page

Jimmy Page of Led Zeppelin is closely associated with a Cherry Sunburst Les Paul blaring through a Marshall Stack. In the studio, he also was known to use a Telecaster for its tonal definition along with effects such as the MXR Blue Box (as heard on the solo of Fool in the Rain).

Slash

Slash

Like Jimmy Page before him, Slash of Guns 'n Roses is closely linked to a Sunburst Les Paul. Also like Page, Slash's no-nonsense riffs helped define the rock tone of an era. Like many '80s players, Slash found use for a Dunlop Cry Baby Wah along with an MXR Phase 90.

Dimebag Darrell

Dimebag Darrell

The late Dimebag Darrell of Pantera forged a unique Southern-tinged "Groove Metal" sound through his career. Probably the most significant endorser of Dean guitars, Dimebag had a number of ML signature models. Amp-wise, he most frequently used Randalls.

Eddie Van Halen

Eddie Van Halen

Eddie Van Halen erupted onto the rock scene in the late '70s and redefined what the guitar could do. Beneath his speed, technical skill and unchained use of harmonics, Eddie combined supped up "super strats" with pedals like the MXR Phase 90 to create his what he dubbed, "the Brown Sound."

David Gilmour

David Gilmour

Pink Floyd is considered one of the most sonically ground-breaking bands of all-time thanks in no small part to the guitar tones of David Gilmour. Gilmour usually played Strats with the occasional Telecaster thrown in, and was an early adopter of a number of effects including the Electro Harmonix Big Muff. Like Pink Floyd's albums, Gilmour constantly explored new textures and techniques through each album.