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Votes
1
"Who turned out the lights?" (Super Bowl XLVII, 2013)
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The much hyped "Harbaugh Bowl" between the Jim-coached San Francisco 49ers and John-coached Baltimore Ravens came to a grinding halt just after half-time, when a 34-minute power outage turned off the lights at the New Orleans Superdome.
Votes
2
No Beast Mode, No Repeat (Super Bowl XLIX, 2015)
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The most watched program in US television history. Seahawks looking to repeat, Brady and Belichick eyeing a fourth title after a decade-long drought. Seahawks up 10 with a quarter to play. Patriots score two touchdowns. Seahawks driving to win; a spectacular catch by Kearse. One yard needed. Three plays to get it. Beast Mode running rampant. But they pass? Rookie Malcolm Butler intercepts on the goal-line. Twitter explodes.
Votes
3
That wardrobe malfunction (Super Bowl XXXVIII, 2004)
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Superstars Janet Jackson and Justin Timberlake joined forces for the Super Bowl half-time show. But no one was talking about music after Timberlake exposed Jackson's breast to a worldwide audience. Accidental or planned, Nipplegate became infamous.
Votes
4
The Helmet Catch (Super Bowl XLII, 2008)
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It's been called the most amazing play in Super Bowl history. The undefeated Patriots are leading with a minute to go, the Giants pinned in their own half. Third and five, Eli Manning drops back, is grabbed by three Patriots, avoids the sacks, and throws it up. Tyree becomes an unlikely hero, pinning the ball to his helmet for a 32-yard gain as Rodney Harrison is draped all over him. The Giants go on to an astonishing upset win.
Votes
5
James Harrison's 100-yard INT return for a TD (Super Bowl XLIII, 2009)
Kurt Warner driving the Cardinals for a go-ahead touchdown on half-time. James Harrison fakes a blitz, intercepts, and goes on a crazy zig-zag 100-yard run to score. A game-changing 14-point swing. Arguably the best and most impactful Super Bowl play ever.
Votes
6
12 seconds to start a rout (Super Bowl XLVIII, 2014)
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A mouthwatering match-up between #1 seeds with 15-3 records. Best offense vs best defense. Then on the first play from scrimmage, MVP Peyton Manning fumbles the snap, Seahawks score a safety. The Broncos are shell-shocked, get demolished 43-8. A record-fastest opening score ignites a record-setting win by a Super Bowl underdog.
Votes
7
Broadway Joe calls his shot (Super Bowl III, 1969)
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One of the greatest upsets in sports history. The NFL-representing Colts were 18 point favorites over the Jets from the much weaker AFL. But three days before the game Joe Namath guaranteed a Jets victory. Everyone scoffed. Then he proved them all wrong.
Votes
8
Leon Lett's big blunder (Super Bowl XXVII, 1993)
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The Cowboys thrashed the Bills 52-17, but that's not what everyone remembers about the Triplets first Super Bowl of the 1990s. In a play ranked that's been voted the #1 Sports Blunder of All-Time, Pro Bowl DT Leon Lett recovered a fumble, rumbling more than 60 yards, only to have the ball stripped on the goal-line as he prematurely celebrated.
Votes
9
Doug Williams helms a 35-point second quarter (Super Bowl XXII, 1988)
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A strike-shortened season. Doug Williams the first African-American QB in a Super Bowl. From the USFL scrap heap to NFL back-up, he'd lost his two regular season starts that season. John Elway led Denver to a 10-0 lead. No team had ever come back from such a deficit. Then Williams fashioned five touchdown drives in less than 15 minutes.
Votes
10
Kicker Garo Yepremian tries to pass (Super Bowl VII, 1973)
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It was the game that crowned the 1972 Miami Dolphins as the only-ever team with a perfect season, but Super Bowl XII is also remembered for perhaps the most bizarre play ever. All-Pro kicker Garo Yepremian has a field goal blocked, only to regather the ball, try to pass, fumble the ball into the air, try to bat it out of bounds, fumbling it again to a Redskins defender, who takes it in for a touchdown. Wow.
Votes
11
Santonio snatches the win with seconds remaining (Super Bowl XLIII, 2009)
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Pittsburgh had blown a 10-point half-time lead as Kurt Warner had the Cardinals running hot, but Roethlisberger found Santonio Holmes in the back corner of the end zone with 35 seconds left to secure the comeback victory and the Steelers' sixth Super Bowl.
Votes
12
One yard short (Super Bowl XXXIV, 2000)
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Five seconds left: he Tennessee Titans have a final shot to score a touchdown to send Super Bowl XXXIV into overtime. WR Kevin Dyson catches the pass, stretches for the end zone, only to be wrapped up agonizingly short by unheralded Rams LB Mike Jones.
Votes
13
This Swann can fly (Super Bowl X, 1976)
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Long before OBJ or David Tyree's Helmet Catch, Steelers WR Lynn Swann was making Sports Illustrated-cover worthy catches. In Super Bowl X, Swann won the MVP with three highlight-reel grabs, including this famous bobbling, acrobatic, 53-yard grab.
Votes
14
Michael Jackson performs (Super Bowl XXVII, 1993)
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In an unprecedented spectacle, the NFL got the King of Pop to perform a pyrotechnics-filled half-time show, cementing the move from marching bands to the biggest artists on the planet performing during the Super Bowl.
Votes
15
Vinatieri kickstarts a dynasty (Super Bowl XXXVI, 2002)
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The "Greatest Show on Turf" Rams were heavily favored to beat the longtime-loser Patriots and their rookie QB Tom Brady. But on the final snap, ice-cool Pats K Adam Vinatieri nailed a 48-yard field goal for the upset victory, kickstarting a dynasty.
Votes
16
Kearse's almost-forgotten catch (Super Bowl XLIX, 2015)
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Seattle WR Jermaine Kearse made a late game spectacular bobbling, falling down catch to rival any in Super Bowl history, setting up the Seahawks for seemingly certain victory... only to be overshadowed by Malcolm Butler's goal-line interception moments later.
Votes
17
Max McGee makes history (Super Bowl I, 1967)
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Max McGee made a spectacular one-handed grab to finish off a 37-yard pass from Bart Starr for the first TD in Super Bowl history. McGee, who caught only four passes all season, caught seven for 138 yards and two TDs in Green Bay's 35-10 win over Kansas City.
Votes
18
Hester kick-starts things in style (Super Bowl XLI, 2007)
The Colts may have comfortably won Super Bowl XLI, but Chicago Bears returner Devin Hester made one of the most spectacular plays ever on the very first play of the game.
Votes
19
Hey, is that John Candy? (Super Bowl XXIII, 1989)
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For the second time, Joe Montana broke Cincinnati hearts in the Super Bowl. Backed up on his own 8-yard line, Joe Cool famously calmed his team-mates by noting John Candy in the crowd, before leading a 92-yard drive culminating in John Taylor's famous TD catch with 34 seconds remaining. The 49ers won 20-16.
Votes
20
Thurman Thomas loses his helmet (Super Bowl XXVI, 1992)
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Star running back Thomas missed the first two plays when he lost track of his helmet after the national anthems. His day wouldn't get better - he only rushed for 13 yards as the Bills were battered by the Redskins for their second of four straight Super Bowl losses.
Votes
21
Bettis enters the arena alone (Super Bowl XL, 2006)
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Hall of Famer Jerome Bettis was playing his final game in his hometown, Detroit, for Super Bowl XL. An excited Bettis charged out of the tunnel while, unbeknownst to him, LB Joey Porter held the rest of the Steelers back to give his teammate a special moment.
Votes
22
Elway gets airborne (Super Bowl XXXII, 1998)
Desperate for Super Bowl success after three brutal losses in the big game, 37-year-old Broncos QB John Elway takes off on 3rd and 8, diving for the first down, helicoptering through the air as he's smashed by two defenders, setting up the go-ahead touchdown.
Votes
23
Who dat!? Porter picks Peyton (Super Bowl XLIV, 2010)
From onside kicks to missed field goals, everything was going the Saints way, but Peyton Manning was driving the Colts downfield with ease to tie the game, until Porter jumped a route, taking it 74 yards to the house to preserve the upset victory for New Orleans.
Votes
24
Eli and the Giants do it again! (Super Bowl XLVI, 2012)
Four years after Tyree's miraculous "Helmet Catch" broke Patriots hearts, Eli Manning led another late game-winning drive to beat New England, this one powered by WR Mario Manningham's balletic sideline catch for 38 yards.
Votes
25
Rookie wins Blunder Bowl with seconds left (Super Bowl V, 1971)
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In a game dominated by defense, the Baltimore Colts committed seven turnovers, had an extra point blocked, missed a field goal, and scored a touchdown only thanks to a fluke ricochet. But in the Super Bowl's first-ever dramatic finish, rookie kicker Jim O'Brien stepped up to nail a 32-yard field goal to win the game 16-13 with 9 seconds left.
Votes
26
"Marcus Allen is a new secret weapon" (Super Bowl XVIII, 1984)
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Facing three defenders behind the line of scrimmage on his own 26-yard-line, Raiders RB Marcus Allen reversed field then weaved his way to a spectacular 74-yard touchdown, as part of a 191-yard MVP performance that saw President Reagan joke after the game that he'd got a call from Moscow saying Allen was a secret weapon that had to be dismantled.
Votes
27
Lombardi exits on his players' shoulders (Super Bowl II, 1968)
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From reviled to beloved by his Packers players, legendary coach Vince Lombardi is carried from the field after his last game ever, a 33-10 win over the Raiders in Super Bowl II.
Votes
28
"The Sickest Man in America" (Super Bowl XIII, 1979)
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Wide open in the endzone, 38-year-old Cowboys tight end Jackie Smith was left prostrate after clanging a certain touchdown pass from Roger Staubach. The Cowboys would lose to the Steelers by four points, 35-31, and the famous blunder almost ruined Smith's life.
Votes
29
Desmond Howard goes 99 yards (Super Bowl XXXI, 1997)
It had been 29 years since Green Bay had tasted Super Bowl glory, but kick returner Desmond Howard helped bring the trophy back to Titletown with this 99-yard return, becoming the first special teams player to ever win Super Bowl MVP.
Votes
30
70 Chip (Super Bowl XVII, 1983)
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The Redskins were down by four in the final quarter, facing a fourth and 1, out of field goal range. A play dialled up for John Riggins to keep the drive alive, 70 Chip, saw the rugged RB burst through the Dolphins defense for a 43-yard touchdown.
Votes
31
Scott Norwood ... wide right! (Super Bowl XXV, 1991)
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In their first-ever Super Bowl, the Buffalo Bills are four seconds and one field goal from victory. "No good...wide right." Norwood is pilloried forever. A foot away from glory, kickstarting four straight Bills Super Bowl losses , and even inspiring a Jim Carrey movie.
Votes
32
A billion-dollar stadium with nowhere to sit? (Super Bowl XLV, 2011)
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The Green Bay Packers vs the Pittsburgh Steelers, in Jerry Jones' brand-new billion-dollar stadium. An all-time record crowd was expected, but someone didn't get the memo, as 1,250 fans turned up to find they didn't have seats to go with their $800 tickets.
Votes
33
Parcells popularizes the Gatorade Bath (Super Bowl XXI, 1987)
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It's a common sight now when teams win championships, but the Super Bowl audience saw it for the first time when Giants linebacker Harry Carson doused Coach Parcells as the Giants closed out their Super Bowl victory over John Elway's Denver Broncos.
Votes
34
Bob Lilly's 29-yard supersack (Super Bowl VI, 1972)
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Legendary Cowboys DT Bob Lilly famously threw his helmet across the field when his team lost the previous years Super Bowl in the final seconds. With a chance for redemption, Lilly would not be denied, chasing down Dolphins QB back, back, back for a 29-yard sack, still the longest negative play in Super Bowl history.
Votes
35
Stallworth's 73-yard TD catch (Super Bowl XIV, 1980)
His fellow wide receiver Lynn Swann may have got most of the glory, but Stallworth made the play of the Steelers fourth Super Bowl title, with a spectacular over-the-shoulder catch on the sprint for this long touchdown.
Votes
36
"Somebody take the monkey off my back!" (Super Bowl XXIX, 1995)
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San Francisco 49ers QB Steve Young finally escaped Joe Montana's shadow by throwing a Super Bowl record six touchdown passes and winning MVP. He couldn't contain his relief near the end of the 49ers' 49-26 blowout of the San Diego Chargers.
Votes
37
The Vikings lose it all, again (Super Bowl XI, 1977)
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Everyone remembers the Buffalo Bills four straight Super Bowl losses without ever winning, but back in the 1970s it was the Minnesota Vikings who were the 'nearly but not quite' team. A 32-14 loss to the Raiders was the Vikings fourth Super Bowl loss, and in the 39 years since Minnesota hasn't ever returned to the Super Bowl, let alone won a title.
Votes
38
The Hammer gets Hammered (Super Bowl I, 1967)
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Before the first-ever AFL vs NFL championship game, Kansas City Chiefs DB Fred "The Hammer" Williamson (24) promised carnage on Green Bay receivers, but instead he was knocked out of Super Bowl I himself after trying to tackle the Packers running back.
Votes
39
The first Refrigerator to score (Super Bowl XX, 1986)
A fan favorite 335lb defensive lineman also used as a fullback, William "Refrigerator" Perry became the heaviest player to ever score in a Super Bowl with this 1-yard TD run.
Votes
40
Kasay kicks the Super Bowl away (Super Bowl XXXVIII, 2004)
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Brady and Vinatieri got the glory with another late drive and last-seconds field goal to win a Super Bowl, but that was only set up by Carolina's John Kasay bombing his kickoff out of bounds after the Panthers had thrillingly tied the game with 73 seconds left.
Votes
41
Three touchdowns in 36 seconds (Super Bowl XXXV, 2001)
The Ravens Jermaine Lewis's 84-yard kickoff return for a touchdown was spectacular enough, but it was in fact only part of 36 seconds of madness in Super Bowl XXV. The Ravens had scored on a 49-yard INT for a TD, only for the Giants to immediately answer with Ron Dixon's 97-yard kickoff return for a TD, then Lewis to do the same.
Votes
42
Martin goes interception-crazy (Super Bowl XV, 1981)
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Oakland Raiders LB Rod Martin intercepted Philadelphia Eagles QB Ron Jaworski's very first pass in the Super Bowl, and things just continued from there, as Martin set a Super Bowl record with three interceptions in a 27-10 victory.
Votes
43
The Bills fumble away their chances (Super Bowl XXVIII, 1994)
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Four years of misery continued for the Buffalo Bills, who lost their fourth straight Super Bowl after leading 13-6 at halftime, only to immediately give up a fumble return for a touchdown to kickstart 24 unanswered second-half points by the Dallas Cowboys.
Votes
44
Meet Jacoby Jones (Super Bowl XLVII, 2013)
Little-known receiver Jones put the Ravens up 21-6 at the half with a 56-yard touchdown catch, then cemented his hero status in Baltimore by breaking the longest touchdown in Super Bowl history with a 109-yard kickoff return to start the second half.
Votes
45
Where's Barret? (Super Bowl XXXVII, 2003)
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Tampa Bay coach Jon Gruden's match-up against his old team, the high-powered Raiders, was disrupted by a bizarre incident when Raiders Pro Bowl C Barret Robbins went AWOL the day before, eventually being hospitalized for depression and missing the Super Bowl.
Votes
46
"65 Toss Power Trap" (Super Bowl IV, 1970)
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With Chiefs coach Hank Stram miked up (something new for NFL audiences), viewers got to hear his prescient call on what's since been considered Kansas City's most iconic play ever. “It might pop wide open,” he said, before Mike Garrett's five-yard TD run that sealed the Chief's sole Super Bowl victory.
Votes
47
An Owner With an Egg on His Head (Super Bowl XXIII, 1989)
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Following the 49ers comeback victory over the Bengals, TE John Frank celebrated by picking up owner Eddie DeBartolo, only to smack his boss's head into a locker. DeBartolo conducted his post-game interviews with a prominent bump swelling on his forehead.
Votes
48
Excuse me, officer? (Super Bowl XXXIII, 1999)
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The day before the Super Bowl, Falcons safety Eugene Robinson received the Bart Starr Award for best exemplifying "outstanding character and leadership in the home, on the field and in the community". That night he was arrested for soliciting sex from an undercover cop. He followed that up by getting burned repeatedly in a 34-10 loss.
Votes
49
This Loser is a Winner, sorta (Super Bowl V, 1971)
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It was perhaps fitting that in a game known as "The Blunder Bowl", where the Baltimore Colts won despite 7 turnovers (11 total in the game), that Cowboys LB Chuck Howley became the only losing player to ever win Super Bowl MVP, for his two interceptions.
Votes
50
Let's celebrate in style! (Super Bowl XXX, 1996)
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To mark the 30th Super Bowl, the NFL for the first time presented the Lombardi trophy to the winning team, the Dallas Cowboys, on the field rather than in the locker room, kickstarting a new tradition of on-field celebrations that continues to this day.

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