What Species of Lemur are You?

More than 80 species of lemur exist on the island of Madagascar, and they're all very different in many ways. Personality varies across lemurs, and they're related to humans, so we wondered...what kind of lemur would you be? Let's find out!

Christopher Smith
On Nov 9, 2014

What is your favorite color?

You are at a party/social gathering. Do you...?

What is your favorite type of exercise?

When it comes to sleeping, are you...?

What's your favorite type of food?

If you could live anywhere, it would be...?

How would you describe your group of friends?

Describe your preferred fashion style.

Ring-tailed Lemur

Ring-tailed Lemur

You are a ring-tailed lemur!
Ring-tailed lemurs are the most social of the lemurs, living in groups of up to 25 individuals. Found in the southwest dry forests and spiny forests of Madagascar, they bet their survival on adaptability: they eat a diversity of foods (even small birds and reptiles), travel on the ground or through the trees, and will remain active on a moonlit night. The most iconic lemur, many people know about the long, black and white striped tail. Many people don't know that ring-tailed lemurs are endangered in the wild and need help for long-term survival in Madagascar. Learn more at http://lemur.duke.edu.
Adopt a ring-tailed lemur and support the Duke Lemur Center by visiting https://gifts.duke.edu/lemur_share !

Coquerel's Sifaka

Coquerel's Sifaka

Athletic, personable, quiet, easy-going. These words describe the Coquerel's sifaka. Coquerel's sifaka live in small groups, typically family. Most of their diet consists of leaves. Long, powerful legs enable sifakas to leap more than 30 feet through the trees in search of their favorite leaves or to escape predators. Sifakas are "dancing" lemurs - they skip sideways across the ground much like a ballerina crosses a stage. An endangered species, these Olympic-level jumpers have been reduced to only a few thousand individuals left in the dry forests of northwestern Madagascar. Learn more at http://lemur.duke.edu.
Adopt the Coquerel's sifaka and support the Duke Lemur Center by visiting https://gifts.duke.edu/lemur_share !

Blue-eyed Black Lemur

Blue-eyed Black Lemur

You got Blue-eyed Black Lemur!
Blue-eyed black lemurs always stand out because of their unique blue eye color. Blue-eyed black lemurs are the only primate species where every individual has blue eyes (unlike, say, humans where only some individuals have blue eyes). Blue-eyed black lemurs are social, but tend to stay in smaller groups. They also tend to be a little high-strung; mothers are very protective and males always watch their backs to make sure a female isn't about to take their food. Blue-eyed black lemurs at the Duke Lemur Center always "rule the roost" and are dominant above every other species they live with. Blue-eyed black lemurs are critically endangered in the wild, with fewer than 6000 possibly left in the wild. Learn more at http://lemur.duke.edu.
Adopt the blue-eyed black lemur and support the Duke Lemur Center by visiting https://gifts.duke.edu/lemur_share

Aye-Aye

Aye-Aye

You got the Aye-Aye!
The largest nocturnal primate and likely the strangest in all the best ways. These lemurs always stand out in a party! Big ears, sharp rodent-like teeth, and spider-like hands with a middle finger that can rotate make the aye-aye one of the most distinct primates. Aye-ayes tap along tree branches looking for tunnels chewed by grubs and bugs. Their sharp teeth chisel a hole into the tunnel and their thin, flexible middle finger lets them reach in to extract the delicious bugs! Aye-ayes love bugs! Solitary and nocturnal, aye-ayes travel and forage alone, but also tend to be active at twilight. Some scientists think aye-ayes can see blue colors and maybe even some ultraviolet, while most nocturnal lemurs are likely color blind. They were once thought to be bad omens and are now considered endangered.Learn more at http://lemur.duke.edu.
Adopt the aye-aye and support the Duke Lemur Center by visiting https://gifts.duke.edu/lemur_share.

Black & White Ruffed Lemur

Black & White Ruffed Lemur

Loud. Black and white ruffed lemurs have an alarm/group vocalization that can be heard nearly a half-mile away. Large in size and with the color pattern of a panda, these lemurs live in the tree tops of the eastern rain forest of Madagascar. Up to 90% of their diet consists of sweet, juicy fruit. The sugary fruits mean that these lemurs get bursts of energy and spend the rest of the day lounging and sleeping. Their thick fur coats make them look soft, but are really important to keep them warm and dry in the almost constant humidity of the rain forest. Black and white ruffed lemurs are critically endangered in the wild because of illegal logging, bushmeat hunting and habitat loss. They are also one of the Top 25 Most Endangered Primates on Earth. Learn more at http://lemur.duke.edu.
Adopt the black and white ruffed lemur and support the Duke Lemur Center by visiting https://gifts.duke.edu/lemur_share.

Mouse Lemur

Mouse Lemur

Ask any lemur scientists which lemurs are the most feisty - grey mouse lemurs. Standing 3 inches tall, weighing 3 ounces and only active at night, mouse lemurs have to be quick, alert and ready to defend themselves against predators or leap onto an unsuspecting moth or beetle. Even small frogs and chameleons fear the mouse lemurs. In mouse lemur world, girls hang out in groups while boys have to hang out by themselves. Mouse lemurs are highly adaptable and live in forests along the west coast and even in the scrubby vegetation along roadsides and villages. Conservationists are less worried about mouse lemurs, but they too are running out suitable habitat and populations are thought to be in decline. Learn more at http://lemur.duke.edu.
Adopt the grey mouse lemur and support the Duke Lemur Center by visiting https://gifts.duke.edu/lemur_share.